COOPS 4 DECENT WORK

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(Source: https://www.un.org/development/desa/cooperatives/international-day-of-cooperatives/2018-2.html)

Organized by the Department of Economic and Social Affairs’ Division of Inclusive Development (DESA, DISD), this meeting was convened to celebrate the International Day of Cooperatives.

The opening segment consisted of an introduction to the 2019 theme of the celebration: “COOPS 4 DECENT WORK.” The Permanent Representatives of Nepal and Mongolia were invited to explain how, due to their democratic nature, cooperatives function as an effective tool for the empowerment of individuals and solidarity of their communities in both developed and developing countries.

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Overview of the 2017 High-Level Political Forum (HLPF) on Sustainable Development

HLPF

Theme: “Eradication Poverty and Promoting Prosperity in a Changing World”

Since the adoption of the 2030 Agenda on Sustainable Development during the United Nations Sustainable Development Summit on 25th September 2015, the first HLPF on Sustainable development was held in 2016 with theme “Ensuring no one is left behind”. This theme was featured in almost all the meetings held at the United Nations throughout the year 2016 and helped some member state and organizations to push for the implementation of the SDGs.
This year, the HLPF on sustainable development convened under the auspices of the Economic and Social Council (ECOSOC) from July 10th to July 19th of 2017 brought together not only Ministers from member states, but also NGOs, Civil Society and Stakeholders, with the theme “Eradicating poverty and promoting prosperity in a changing world”. The 2017 HLPF included a three-day ministerial meeting where member states presented their reviews. More countries were seen to be committed to the implementation of the sustainable development goals (SDGs) and volunteered to present their national voluntary reviews during the 8 days HLPF session. In total, 44 countries volunteered to present their voluntary national reviews (VNRs) during the 2017 HLPF compared to only 22 countries that volunteered to present their VNRs in 2016.

The following set of goals were reviewed in detail during the session, including Goal 17

SDG TAble-1

The voluntary national reviews (VNRs) enable countries to share their experiences on the implementation of the 2030 Agenda, including their successes, challenges, and lessons learned during the HLPF. The VNRs also facilitates partnerships including the participation of major groups and other stakeholders during the HLPF.
In brief, the HLPF is a central platform for follow-up and review of the 2030 Agenda and the SDGs. During the HLPF, Ministers adopts a ministerial declaration, which is expected to provide political leadership, guidance, and recommendations on the implementation of the 2030 Agenda. It also addresses new and emerging issues with respect to the implementation of the SDGs and highlights country experiences.
Written by WIT Representative: Fred Yonghabi

 

Making Eradication of Poverty an integral objective of all policies

The meeting was organized in two sessions at the United Nations headquarters to discuss what it will take to make eradication of poverty an integral objective of all policies.

The key points highlighted during the discussions showed that destabilizing poverty in Africa is a result of climate change causing drought, conflict, and instability.  Conflicts in
Sub-Sahara particularly increases the poverty levels and instability of the population.  The representative from DESA stressed the importance of adherence to the Paris Agreement.
Ambassador Charwath, in addition, stressed the need for more integration of power sources which includes women.   This is particularly important in promoting reproductive rights and sexual education at the highest level of government.
Overall, the panel members stressed the importance of partnerships of ECOSOC and NGO’s with other government sectors within the continent of Africa.

Meeting: Making Eradication of Poverty an integral objective of all policies: What will it take?

Date/Location: Wednesday, May 10th, 2017; Economic and Social Council Chamber, United Nations Headquarters NY

Speakers:

  • Morning session moderated by Mr. David Mehdi Human, Director of the Office of The Special Advisers on Africa.
  • Afternoon session moderated by Elliott Harris, Assistant Secretary General and Head of Office in NY, United Nations Environment Program with key speakers H.E. Mr. Philip Charwath, Deputy Permanent Representative to Austria to the United Nations, Chair of the Commission on Social Development at its 55th session.
H.E Mr. David Donoghue Permanent Representative of Ireland to the United Nations. Chair of commission on the Status of Women at its 62nd Session.
Ms. Christina Popescu, Counsellor in the Permanent Mission of Romania to the United Nations, Vice -Chair of the Commission on population and development st its 50th session.
Prof. Jose Antonio Ocampo Professor from Columbia University.

Written By: Amadeus P. Shebinsky

Edited By: Fred Yonghabi

 

Poverty

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Promoting Indigenous Youth Development to achieve the 2030 Agenda

UN Indigenous

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The UNPFII sixteenth session which discussed the “Tenth Anniversary of the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples: measures taken to implement the Declaration” presented a side event which discussed the significance of promoting the development of indigenous youth in order to attain the 2030 agenda. There was discussion regarding the lack of data regarding indigenous youth and the startling nature of the available data. Additionally, the huge disparities in terms of accessing education for indigenous youth was discussed

Mai Thin Yu Mon conveyed the difficulty of cultivating indigenous youth data, especially for health. She conveyed the struggle of indigenous people to communicate with foreign individuals who provide health services. This was cited as an issue affecting primarily young people and elders. Furthermore, Mon expressed the issue that indigenous youths are brainwashed to feel that their culture is lower.

Sarah Lynn Jancke described that indigenous youth are suffering in silence and battling societal oppression. She called for the connection of indigenous youth and people of all cultures. Jancke depicted the intergenerational trauma that arose from indigenous teenagers having children.

Various statistical evidence regarding the lack of educational access for indigenous youth was conveyed. On average, in the Latin America and Caribbean region, eighty-five percent of indigenous youth attend secondary school. However, only forty percent of indigenous youth graduate.

The literacy and numeracy rates of indigenous and non-indigenous youth alter significantly. For example, in Australia, a two and a half school year gap is evident between indigenous and non-indigenous children. However, there is no data citing a global indigenous youth literacy rate.

In addition, the high school finishing rate of indigenous youth are below average in Nunavut, the northernmost territory of Canada. Merely forty percent of indigenous youth are attending school full time.

Meeting: UNPFII Sixteenth Session Side event on “Promoting Indigenous Youth Development to achieve the 2030 Agenda”

Date/ Location: Thursday, April 27, 2017; 11:30-1:00; Conference Room F

Speakers: Mai Thin Yu Mon, Indigenous Youth Caucus Asia; Q’apaj Cond, Indigenous Youth Caucus Latin America; Sarah Lynn Jancke, Indigenous Youth Caucus Arctic; Nicola Shepherd, UN Focal Point on Youth, DSPD; Tarcila Rivera, UN Permanent Forum on Indigenous Issues, Expert Member; Yon Fernandez-De-Larrinoa, Indigenous Peoples Team Leader, FAO Rome; Carlos Andrade, Undersecretary of Peoples and Interculturality Government of Ecuador (TBC)

Written By: WIT Representative Donna Sunny

 

 

Open Call for NGOs to apply for Consultative Status with the United Nations for 2018

UN ECOSOC

UN ECOSOC

As an NGO in Consultative Status with the United Nations Economic and Social Council (ECOSOC), World Information Transfer Inc. would like to inform the public about the open call for NGOs to apply for Consultative Status for 2018 with the United Nations.

NGOs interested in applying for ECOSOC consultative status should submit their application and required documents on or before the deadline of 1 June 2017. The following link provides background information, the benefits of consultative status and instructions for how to apply:

http://csonet.org/index.php?page=view&nr=337&type=230&menu=14

Making the World of Books Accessible to People who are Print Disabled

 

innovtech-pwdsMs. Bas began by presenting the Treaty of Marrakesh, which addresses the current relative lack of availability of print material to print disabled individuals, as the next step in the Post-2015 Development Agenda’s efforts of leaving no one behind. All of the efforts thus far tell us that mainstreaming disabilities is a successful but slow process. It is thus imperative that we encourage promotion and awareness of this new treaty.

Ambassador Webson approved the treaty because the world is now in a position in which it can address the problem of the “book famine”–just 1.7% of print material is available to people that are blind or otherwise print disabled. Thanks to Marrakesh, however, barriers to information are being removed and a new world is being opened up to the print disabled. This is especially significant when considering that access to information is key to getting an education, and education in turn is an proven path out poverty.

Mr. LaBarre discussed the Accessible Book Consortium (ABC), saying that it achieved three objectives:  (1) getting permission from rights holders so entities can exchange book copies across borders; (2) capacity building to enable countries to put books into accessible formats; and (3) accessible publishing, meaning all books are initially created digitally. Mr. Power added that the technology is in place to secure the achievement of such goals, but we must now enable this technology to be available internationally. Cost is also an issue for braille and audio reader technologies, but lower cost solutions are on the way.

Mr. Mitra asserted that addressing the print disabled is a central mission for UNICEF. The education system fails millions of children around the world, yet the technology exists to create book in formats that are accessible to all people. Of course, costs and resources are issues, but to create accessible books requires a one-time production cost at the beginning of the process. If we wish to meet goal number 4, he concluded, there is no other way than to ensure that all textbooks are available to all children.

 

Meeting: Innovative Technologies: Making the world of books accessible to people who are print disabled
Date & Location: 25 March 2015, Conference Room 9, UN Headquarters, New York
Speakers: Ms. Daniela Bas, Director, Division for Social policy and Development, united Nations Department of Economic and Social Affairs (UNDESA).   H.E. Dr. W. Aubrey Webson, Ambassador, Permanent Representative of Antigua and Barbuda to the United Nations, New York.   Mr. Scott LaBarre, Board Member, Accessible Books Consortium and Representative, World Blind Union. Mr. Dave Power, President and Chief Executive Officer, Perkins, Watertown. Mr. Gopal Mitra, Programme Specialist, Children with Disabilities, Gender Rights and Civic Engagement, UNICEF, New York. Moderator: Ms. Lucinda Longcroft, Head, WIPO New York Office.
Written By WIT Representative: James Victory
Edited by WIT Representative: Philip Bracey

Panel Discussion: Independent Oversight Role of Supreme Audit Institutions in Implementing the Post-2015 Development Agenda

A.post-2015_12This meeting was held to discuss the importance of supreme auditing institutions (SAI) in the post-2015 development agenda. The representative of UNDESA stated that SAIs are necessary if we want to go towards an inclusive and peaceful society with a focus on sustainable development. SAIs promote accountability in different critical sectors including education, healthcare, and water sanitation. He said that, looking forward, SAIs will play an even more significant role regarding implementing and promoting SDGs. He also stated that international communities should help developing countries foster transparency and efficiency.

Dr. Josef Moser outlined specific benefits of SAI, and what international cooperation with INTOSAI, encouraged by the UN for all levels, entails. He first asserted that MDGs can only be attained with cost-effective accountability, as there will be more impact per dollar invested. For shortcomings in government capacity or a lack of transparency, accountability, and/or ownership that could prevent the attainment of MDGs, INTOSAI can provide technical know-how and assessment through financial, compliance, and performance audits. However, SAIs face domestic obstacles, such as a lacking mandate to audit government performance or a lack rules regarding accounting, reporting, and monitoring. To foster national independence after capacity building through SAIs, Moser encouraged governments to intensify communication with INTOSAI.

Responding to a question on the extent of SAI’s presence in cooperating countries, Dr. Moser stated that SAI’s functions are grading standards and capacity building, as conducted by experts of the International Development Initiative within INTOSAI. He and Ambassador Oh emphasized that, as an international standard of practice is lacking in both developed and developing countries, SAIs are a platform of implementing MDGs that nations and organizations must make good use of.

Meeting: Panel discussion on “Independent Oversight Role of Supreme Audit Institutions in Implementing the Post-2015 Development Agenda”
Date & Location: Wednesday, January 21, 2015. Conference Room 8, United Nations Headquarters, New York
Speakers: H.E. Ambassador Martin Sajdik, Permanent Representative of Austria to the UN and President of ECOSOC; H.E. Ambassador Oh Joon, Permanent Representative of the Republic of Korea to the UN; Dr. Josef Moser, Secretary-General of INTOSAI and President of the Austrian Court of Audit, Representative of UNDESA
Written By WIT Representatives: Alis Yoo, Brian Lee, and James Victory
Edited By WIT Representative: Philip Bracey

Second Commitee Discusses Globalization and Interdependence

Mr. Willem van der Geest, Chief of the Development Strategy and Policy Branch of the Development Policy and Analysis Division in DESA introduced the report that provides an overview of the economic, social and environmental challenges we are facing. The report noted, with respect to economic challenges, that the need for more effective international policy coordination has become an imperative against the backdrop of a fragile recovery of the global economy and various downside risks. In regard to the social challenges the report noted that reducing inequality is at the core of a new ‘International Economic Order’. Lastly, the report noted in environmental challenges that an integrated vision that includes the social, economic, environmental and governance components of urbanization is required.

Next, Mr John Wilmoth, Director Population Division, Department of Economic and Social Affairs (DESA) noted three critical points. First, it is important to maintain the momentum and widespread support for including migrants, migration and mobility in the post-2015 development agenda. Second, it is imperative to promote peaceful societies and facilitate safe and orderly migration. Third, greater efforts are required to ensure that data on migration and its impact on development are collected, analysed and used for effective policy-making.

The representative of Bolivia on behalf of the Group of 77 and China commenced the general discussion by noting that the nexus between migration and development must be addressed comprehensibly and include a cultural and human perspective. They also suggested that the international community should explore a legally binding convention on migration and development to improve the governance of international migration and to protect human rights of migrants. The Representative of Saint Vincent and the Grenadines on behalf of the Caribbean Community (CARICOM) stated the importance of globalization being inclusive and equitable. They also highlighted that their cultural sectors are significant contributors to job creation, economic development and their national pride and identities. The Representative of Philippines on behalf of the Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN) stated that they envisage the free flow of services and the free flow of skilled labour, both of which have a deep impact on international migration and development in the region. Finally, the representative of Malawi on behalf of the African Group noted that the current process of globalization is generating unbalanced outcomes, both among and within countries. Malawi called on the international community to assist in enhancing regional and international cooperation for research and technological development.

 

Meeting Title: 22nd and 23rd meeting of the Second Commitee: ‘Globalization and Interdependence [item 21]’
Date: 27 October 2014
Location: Conference Room 2, UN Headquarters, New York
Written by WIT Representative: Aslesha Dhillon

Edited by WIT Representative: Philip Bracey