Promotion and Protection of Human Rights

 

The “Promotion and Protection of Human Rights” meeting focussed on a new mandate that addresses the importance of combating terrorism while at the same time protecting human rights and putting a special view on gender inclusivity.  F. Ni Aolain of Ireland, who was recently promoted to Special Rapporteur, was responsible for writing this mandate.

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The Special Rapporteur outlined four key points regarding the pressing issues of terrorism and human rights.  First, the normalization of atrocities will not help solve the issue of terrorism and will only exacerbate the problem.  Additionally, an excessive amount of laws is not always effective and can often create arbitrariness and inconsistencies.  Also, the advancement of a civil society is threatened by terrorism and the rights of people, especially marginal groups, are at risk.  Lastly, efficiency of counter terrorism involves taking gender into account, specifically how women are impacted by extremism and how first-hand accounts from victims of terrorism are essential for global discussions.

The Netherlands, Norway, Ireland, Belgium, and Mexico all similarly asked for elaboration on the role of civil society in preventing radicalization and terrorism.  Some countries such as Saudi Arabia, Kenya, Iraq, and Qatar all voiced their unique and localized perspective on terrorism and human rights.  Finally, various other countries viewed the pre-existing human rights measures of the United Nations as sufficient enough and saw the mandate as repetitive.

The Special Rapporteur responded by reiterating that the mandate will specifically address human rights protection and that civil societies have the power and responsibility to help lessen terrorism.  The Special Rapporteur also stated that including victims’ accounts, especially women’s perspectives, will provide a more effective forum to mitigate terrorism and promote human rights protections.

Meeting title: Promotion and Protection of Human Rights

Date/Location: Wednesday, October 18, 2017; 10:00-13:00; Conference Room 1, United Nations Headquarters, New York, NY

Speakers: Madame F. Ni Aolain, Special Rapporteur

Written by: David Jansen

 

 

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The Rights of Refugees and Migrants with Disabilities

This meeting was a side-event of the Conference of Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities. It explored the issue of refugees and migrants with disabilities.

The struggled integration of refugees with disabilities into the labour market bolsters the severity of the global refugee crisis.

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According to European Pillars of Social Rights, disability is taken into the humanitarian considerations when assessing refugee status, but untrained personnel frequently struggle to spot refugees with intellectual disabilities. Further problems emerge when reception centres are ill equipped to accommodate disabilities.

The international community has to reaffirm its commitments to New York Declaration by improving the Refugee Response Framework. Non-discrimination screening must be held and need-based assistance must be provided.

The World Food Programme has begun efforts to ensure food accessibility to all refugees. Ms. Iseminger anticipated that a data collection process will contribute to the creation of a disability handbook to assess and address disabled refugee needs going forward.

Refugees with disability must be protected to ensure no one is left behind.

Meeting: Persons with disabilities on the move- the rights of refugees and migrants with disabilities

Date/Location: Tuesday, 13th June 2017; 13:15 to 14:30; Conference Room 4, United Nations Headquarters, New York, NY

Speakers: Ms. Diane Kingston, Deputy Director of CBM International Advocacy and Alliances; Mr. Michel Servoz, Director General for Employment, European Commission; Ms. Mia Farah, Inclusion International – ‘Working with refugees with disabilities in Lebanon;’ Mr. Andrew Painter, Senior Policy Advisor of the UN High Commissioner for Refugees – ‘Global Compact on Refugees;’ Mr. Craig Mokhiber, Deputy Assistant Secretary-General, Office of the UN High Commissioner for Human Rights – ‘Global Compact on Migration;’ Ms. Michelle Iseminger, Senior External Partnerships Officer-in-charge, World Food Programme – ‘Including persons with disabilities in mainstream programmes.’

Written by: WIT Representative Edward Chan

Edited by: WIT Representative Mariel Brunman

UN establishing a new Counter-Terrorism office to strengthen international cooperation on combatting terrorism and ensuring human rights and the rule of law.

The 87th plenary meeting of the General Assembly established a new Counter-Terrorism Office to counter transnational threats: the United Nations Global Counter-Terrorism Strategy. A new Under-Secretary- General will head it.

H.E. Peter Thomson remarked that the new office would strengthen international cooperation in all forms while reaffirming UN’s determination on anti-terrorism regarding the four pillars set in 2006 – addressing the conditions conducive to the spread of terrorism, preventing and combatting terrorism, building states’ capacity and strengthening the role of the UN and, ensuring human rights and the rule of law.

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Canada and Turkey welcomed the adoption, with Representative from Canada exhorting the UN in finding the best person for the post of USG. Representative from India viewed the adoption as demonstrating a new path for collective and coordinative actions, while Representative from Norway wished the New Office to perform better in terms of external and internal communication. Representative from Israel was confident that his government could act as a role model for the New Office as it had ample experiences in combating terror.

Representative from Iraq, however, doubted the decision in two aspects. First, the financing structure of the New Office depended on voluntary funds from member-states, which might cause misgivings of impartiality and inefficiency; second, there was no guarantee for transparency and inclusiveness. He urged for a more equal and translucent election process.

Representative from Syria expressed a reserved attitude to the 3rd paragraph of the draft resolution, which he alleged contains serious and unjustified precedence while offending the collective work. He then explicitly accused Saudi Arabia of funding terrorist groups in Syria. Representative from Saudi Arabia responded by blaming the Syrian government in violating human rights such as using excessive arms towards civilians, which he thought they were not qualified to blame terrorism. Representative from Syria, exercising his right of reply, criticized Saudi Arabia in intervening their domestic affairs. He lastly promised to cooperate with the international community to combat terrorists supported by Saudi Arabia.

Meeting: General Assembly 87th plenary meeting – the United Nations Global Counter-Terrorism Strategy

Date/Time: Thursday, June 15, 2017; 10:00-12:30; General Assembly Hall, United Nations Headquarters, New York, NY

Speakers:  H.E. Peter Thomson, President of the General Assembly of the UN; Representatives from 188 countries

Written by: WIT Representative Jason Lai

Counter-Terrorism and Human Rights

 

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Session 5 of the Counter-Terrorism Committee Executive Directorate on “Preventing the Exploitation of Information and Communications Technologies (ICTs) for Terrorist purposes, while Respecting Human Rights and Fundamental Freedoms” addressed civil society’s role in using ICTs for counter-terrorism messaging purposes. Ms. Humera Khan, moderator for the technical meeting and Executive Director of Muflehun, introduced four panelists whose organizations actively take part in global counterterrorist messaging. A member of Al-Azhar Observer, . Mahmoud Nagah Ahmed Farag Khalaf, remarked, “The internet and social media are arenas for terrorist organizations.” As the use of social media increases, the goal of terrorist organizations has transitioned from gaining attention to gaining members. They promote extremist ideologies on platforms like Facebook, Twitter, and YouTube by manipulating social, political, and religious views in their favor. Online advertisements have become extremely desirable for terrorist organizations, allowing them to easily recruit vulnerable people.

While terrorist organizations using the Internet for manipulation is a threat, there are benefits to their online activity. Mr. Ross Fernett, co-founder of Moonshot CVE, highlighted that the Internet has allowed people to track these organizations, obtain more information about them, and prevent some large scale potential disasters. This form of violence prevention was nearly impossible a generation ago. NGOs, such as The Foundation for the Study of Democracies, collect information like logos and specific language frequently used in terrorist media and spread them to the general public to counter-message their ideologies. Other NGOs create peer to peer relationships in which trained individuals correspond with those who show interest in terrorist organizations. However, this tactic becomes a legal issue for other nations, as interest is legally seen as either a free expression of thought, or as a serious threat to society.

Meeting: Technical Meeting of the Counter-Terrorism Committee Executive Directorate on “Preventing the Exploitation of Information and Communications Technologies for Terrorist Purposes, while Respecting Human Rights and Fundamental Freedoms”

Date/Time/Location: Thursday, 1 December 2016; 10:00 to 12:00; United Nations Headquarters, Conference Room 4

Speakers: Ms. Humera Khan, Executive Director of Muflehun; Mr. Nash Borges, Chief Technology Officer of U.S. Global Engagement Center; Dr. Mahmoud Nagah Ahmed Farag Khalaf, member of Al-Azhar Observer; Mr. Maxim Grigoryev, Director of The Foundation for the Study of Democracies; Mr. Ross Fernett, Co-founder of Moonshot CVE

Written By: Leticia Murillo, WIT Representative

 

“We Will Stand Against Discrimination”

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In its 53rd and 54th meetings on November 21st, the Third Committee discussed actions on six draft resolutions: advancement of women; report of the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees, questions relating to refugees, returnees, and displaced persons and humanitarian questions; report of the Human Rights Council; right of peoples to self-determination; promotion and protection of human rights, human rights questions, including alternative approaches for improving the effective enjoyment of human rights and fundamental freedoms; and crime prevention and criminal justice. The Committee passed all draft resolutions, with some needing revisions.

Holy See, Slovakia, the United States, and South Africa were among countries that approved the draft resolutions discussed. It was agreed that stigmas affecting pregnant women and children must end and that education is the best form of HIV/AIDS prevention. Additionally, the United Nations needs to use human rights based approaches regarding people with HIV/AIDS and their individuals struggles. Throughout the meeting, representatives emphasized discrimination against the LGBTQ+ community in the form of gender identity and sexual orientation based violence that afflict non-cisgendered and non-heterosexual individuals globally. Several delegates claimed global campaigns and empowerment practices were only a few of the necessary approaches for women and members of the LGBTQ+ community to exercise and enjoy their full human rights.

Countries opposing some resolutions included the Russian Federation, Mexico, and Singapore. The Representative of  the Russian Federation argued that as a unique United Nations body with universal representation, the Third Committee must respect the disparate views of various countries. The Representative of Singapore agreed and added that delegations have the right to express the needs of their countries in the context of their cultures. H.E. Ambassador of Mexico stated that it is impossible to find a universal definition regarding this issue within the Committee.

Meeting: Third Committee, 53rd/54th Meetings (AM/PM), 71th General Assembly

Date/Time/Location: Monday, 21 November 2016; 10:00 to 13:00, 15:00; United Nations Headquarters

Speakers: Committee Secretary; Representative of the Holy See; Representative of Slovakia; Representative of Norway; Representative of Jamaica; Representative of Iceland; Representative of Senegal; Representative of Malaysia; Representative of Chile; Representative of Israel; Representative of Liechtenstein; Representative of the United Kingdom; Representative of Nauru; Representative of Uganda; Representative of the United Republic of Tanzania; Representative of South Africa; Representative of Spain; Representative of Argentina; Representative of Papua New Guinea; Representative of India; H.E. Ambassador of Botswana; Representative of South Africa; Representative of Yemen; Representative Russian Federation; Representative of Thailand; Representative of Congo; Representative of Singapore; Representative of Japan; Permanent Representative of Egypt; Representative of Brazil; Representative of the United States; H.E. Ambassador of the Republic of Korea; H.E. Ambassador of Mexico

Written By: Janet Lee, WIT Representative

 

Migration is a Global Challenge and a Global Chance

 

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Monday, global representatives gathered under the Ninth Global Forum on Migration and Development (GFMD) where delegates discussed and investigated three topics: the social, economic, and legal aspects of the Global Migration Compact. Ambassador Shahidul Haque gave opening remarks. He expressed that a rise in globalization can be attributed to the fluidity in current global migration. Claiming ignorance to be a fatal mistake, he argued that migration is not a political nor social issue, but a component of sustainability and global development.

Several representatives voiced concerns on the effects of forced migration on women, children, and families. The Paris Agreements and many global partnerships since have been successful policies on aiding migrants and countries alike with forced migration. Mr. Jan Eliasson, Deputy Secretary General of the UN, expressed optimism  in the SDGs and the 2030 Agenda, especially concerning access to healthcare resources and educational opportunities. Being an issue that only recently became an official goal of the UN, accurate research and understanding of current migration trends is vital for representatives to be cooperative and helpful in drafting global solutions.

Negative community and family perceptions of migrants versus the reality that migrants live was discussed throughout the day. Mental, social, and emotional damages endured before, during, and after the migration affect people’s roles in their host countries. Challenges also arise with historical, cultural, and language differences and barriers that migrants experience in new, host countries. Non-discriminatory and inclusive protection of safety and human rights should be a priority for migrants in host countries. Ms. Eva Sandis of the NGO Committee on Migration emphasized the need for partnership and participation in civil society in order to protect migrants on a day to day basis. Concluding remarks were made by H.E. Ambassador Shahidul Haque, “Migration is a global challenge and global chance.” It depends how the international community approaches the migration issues are the realities for millions of people.

Meeting: Permanent Mission of Bangladesh and Global Forum on Migration and Development (GFMD)-Troika, “Global Migration Compact”

Date/Location: Monday, 14 November, 2016; 10:00-10:35, 10:45-12:45, 14:15-16:00, and 16:15-17:00; United Nations Headquarters, Conference Room 12

Speakers: H.E. Ambassador Shahidul Haque, Foreign Secretary of Bangladesh and GFMD 2016 Chair; H.E. Ambassador Masud Bin Momen, Permanent Representative of Bangladesh to the UN in New York; Mr. Sönke Lorenz, Head of Migration Issues, Ministry of Foreign Affairs, Germany; Mr. Ahmed Skim, Director of Migration Affairs, Ministry in charge of Moroccans Residing Abroad and Migration Affairs, Morocco; H.E. Ambassador Mr. Mehmet Samsar, Director General for Consular Affairs, Turkey; Mr. Gregory A. Maniatis, Senior Adviser to Mr. Peter Sutherland, the UN Special Representative for International Migration; Ms. Izumi Nakamitsu, Special Adviser ad interim on Follow-up to the Summit on Addressing Large Movements of Refugees and Migrants; Mr. Jan Eliasson, Deputy Secretary General, United Nations; H.E. Ambassador William Lacy Swing, Director General, International Organization for Migration; Ms. Sadia Faizunnesa, Director General (UN), Ministry of Foreign Affairs, Bangladesh; Mr. Gervais Appave, Senior Policy Adviser, International Organization for Migration; Mr. Enrico Fos, Minister, Permanent Mission of the Philippines to the UN in Geneva; Mrs. Samantha Jayasuriya, Deputy Permanent Representative, Permanent Mission of Sri Lanka to the UN in Geneva; Ms. Eva Sandis, NGO Committee on Migration; H.E. Ambassador Mr. Riaz Hamidullah, High Commissioner of Bangladesh to Sri Lanka; Mr. Dilip Ratha, Lead Economist, Development Prospects Group and Manager DEC-PREM Migration and Remittances Unit, World Bank; Mr. Arturo Cabrera, Former Deputy Minister for Migration, Ecuador; H.E. Ambassador Javier Carbajosa Sánchez, Ambassador at Large for Migration Issues; Ms. Megdelawit Kidane, Global Coalition on Migration (GCM); Ms. Lynn Shotwell, Executive Director at Council for Global Immigration; Ms. Nahida Sobhan, Minister, Permanent Mission to the UN in Geneva, Bangladesh; Mr. Ryszard Cholewinski, Migration Policy Specialist, International Labour Organization; Mr. Erica Usher, Senior Director at Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship, Canada; Mr. Samson Lungo, First Secretary, Permanent Mission of Zambia to the UN in Geneva; Mr. Craig Mokhiber, Chief, Development, Economic and Social Issues Branch, Office of the High Commissioner for Human Rights; Mr. Pablo Ceriani Cernadas, Vice-chairperson, Committee on Migrant Workers; H.E. Ambassador M. Shameem Ahsan, Permanent Representative of bangladesh to the UN in Geneva; Mr. Thomas Gass, Assistant Secretary General, UN Department of Economic and Social Affairs; Professor Michael Doyle, University of Columbia, New York; Mr. Christian Leffler, EU Deputy Secretary General in charge of Economic and Global Issues in the European External Action Service and In Charge of Migration Issues

Written By: Janet Lee, WIT Representative

The Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities Turns 10

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This informal meeting discussed the conventions of the CRPD and how the public can move towards a full realization of its objectives. Ms. Ito began by stating that the CRPD is inclusive in its nature, meaning participation must be intersectional and honor many perspectives.

Mr. Sauer added that the CRPD is working to implement the 2038 Development Framework that has incorporated issues of people with disabilities as a core element. Officials must scale up collective inclusive efforts within the 2030 Agenda for its success. The Secretary General submitted reports on inclusion and accessibility for persons with disabilities within the United Nations this year. The CRPD hopes that the report will lead UN work to reflect these concerns.

Disabilities should be discussed in the context of social inclusion and issues of global poverty. As Mr. Cuk stated, people with disabilities’ rights are human rights, and this should not be a notion solely on paper. UN officials and the public need to take responsibility and  work to include people with disabilities in decision making processes and draft proposals to reflect their needs and concerns.

Ms. Myangi, Ms. Ero, Ms. Cisternas, and Ms. Devandas shared experiences of discrimination. They expressed that this year has been successful in mapping solutions, however further efforts are needed at the international level. Support for desegregation, public education, and work to reduce local poverty must increase. It is critical to move away from discriminatory practices and towards mindsets and policies that empower and people with disabilities.

Mr. Sandoval and Mr. Taula closed the discussion and expressed that the international community and United Nations must work to validate the issues that affect people with disabilities for all to enjoy human rights.

Meeting: ‘The Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (CRPD) Turns 10,” How Can We Move Towards a Full Realization of the Purpose and Objectives of the Convention?’

Date/Location: Wednesday, 26 October, 2016; 15:00 to 16:30; Conference Room 12

Speakers: Ms. Akiko Ito, Chief Secretariat for the CRPD, UN-DESA; His Excellency Mr. Oh Joon, Ambassador Extraordinary and Plenipotentiary, Permanent Representative of the Republic of Korea; His Excellency Mr. Kai Sauer, Ambassador Extraordinary and Plenipotentiary, Permanent Representative of Finland; Mr. Vladimir Cuk, Executive Director of IDA; Ms. Susan Mwangi, First Counsellor, Permanent Mission of Kenya; Ms. Ikponwosa Ero, Independent Expert on the Enjoyment of Human Rights by Persons with Albinism; Ms. Maria Soledad Cisternas, Chairperson of the Committee on the Right of Persons with Disabilities; Ms. Catalina Devandas, UN Special Rapporteur on the Right of Persons with Disabilities; His Excellency Mr. Juan Sandoval, Ambassador, Deputy Permanent Representative of Mexico; His Excellency Mr. Phillip Taula, Ambassador, Deputy Permanent Representative of New Zealand

Written By: Ashley Lee, WIT Representative

 

Human Rights Protection in Closed Society: Myanmar and North Korea

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Aspects of the current humanitarian crises in Myanmar and the People’s Republic of Korea were discussed in this session. In Myanmar, Islamic members of the Rohingya community in Rakhine State are subject to extreme prejudice. Meanwhile, the citizens of the People’s Republic of Korea are attempting to recover, with insufficient aid, from damage caused by major flooding.

Yanghee Lee, the Special Rapporteur on the Situation of Human Rights in Myanmar, called for action against the systematic discrimination prevalent against vulnerable Islamic minorities in the Rakhine State. There is a shortage of medical care in the region. Ms. Lee discussed how this issue could be combatted through the ratification of core human rights treaties.

Despite six decades of armed conflict, Myanmar has recently been experiencing change at a rapid pace. A democratic governmental system has been put in place to promote the shift from a closed society to an open society. However, radical religious leaders trained by the Taliban still play a role in the nation’s politics.

The representative of the United States emphasized the value of global humanitarian aid and called for it in Myanmar. She strongly supported Ms. Lee’s proposed citizenship program for inhabitants of Myanmar. The US representative expressed concerned about the unwarranted arrest of journalists and political figures, but was pleased to hear of their releases.

The representative of the European Union questioned the role of women in the process of peace negotiations. Furthermore, the representative of Australia addressed the rights of the LGBTQIA community as some are targeted and imprisoned in Myanmar.

Additionally, Tomás Ojea Quintana, the Special Rapporteur on the Situation of Human Rights in the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, stated that despite the massive flooding in North Korea, the nation’s fifth nuclear test launch occurred. Only 10% of the required necessities have been attained for aid and with winter approaching, this was concluded to be an issue for North Korea and the international community.

Meeting: Third Committee, 32nd Meeting on the Promotion and Protection of Human Rights

Date/Time/Location: Thursday, 27 October, 2016; 10:00 to 13:00; Conference Room 1

Speakers: Yanghee Lee, Special Rapporteur on the Situation of Human Rights in Myanmar; Representative of Myanmar; Representative of Norway; Representative of United States of America; Representative of China; Representative of Japan; Representative of Eritrea; Representative of Thailand; Representative of European Union; Representative of Australia; Representative of Switzerland; Representative of Egypt; Representative of Russian Federation; Representative of Lao People’s Democratic Republic; Representative of Cuba; Representative of Czech Republic; Representative of Jordan; Representative of Singapore; Representative of United Kingdom; Representative of Philippines; Representative of Vietnam; Representative of Saudi Arabia; Representative of Iran; Representative of Organization of Islamic Cooperation; Tomás Ojea Quintana, Special Rapporteur on the Situation of Human Rights in the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea; Representative of South Korea; Representative of Venezuela speaking on behalf of the Non-Aligned Movement; Representative of Syrian Arab Republic; Representative of Liechtenstein; Representative of Netherlands; Representative of United Kingdom; Representative of Belarus; Representative of Germany; Representative of Jordan; Representative of Maldives; Representative of Ireland; Representative of Argentina

Written By: Donna Sunny, WIT Representative

Intersectionality is Human Rights

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The Third Committee’s meeting focused on basic human rights for people with disabilities. The chairperson, María Soledad Cisternas Reyes, began by stating that she believes sign language must be preserved and should be recognized as an official global language at the UN. Ms. Reyes emphasized inclusive educational opportunities for people with disabilities as a necessity, and that voting rights should be a priority. She also spoke to the need for intersectional representation in gender and people with disabilities at the UN and in other decision-making positions.

The Special Rapporteur on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities, Catalina Devandas Aguilar, expressed that communtiy policies neeed to include people with disabilities in the drafting process and in enactment. People need to be able to live independently and have access to resources, such as wheelchairs, personal care supplies, and new beneficial technology. Ms. Aguilar stated a community-based approach would be the most effective in involving and empowering people with disabilities.

In closing, Ikponwosa Ero, the Independent Expert on the Enjoyment of Human Rights of Persons with Albinism, spoke to the necessity of including people with albinism in human rights discussions. Many people with albinism have been violently attacked due to prejudice, or myths that connect albinism to witchcraft in several cultures. Some believe albinism is connected to cancer, which further leads to isolation and acts of violence. Ms. Ero concluded with the message that albinism awareness and education needs to spread to rural communities if targeted violence against people with albinism is to stop.

Meeting: 27th Meeting of the Third Committee, “Promotion and Protection of Human Rights”

Date/Time/Location: Wednesday, 26 October 2016; 10:00 to 13:00; Conference Room 1

Speakers: María Soledad Cisternas Reyes, Chair of the Committee on Rights of Persons with Disabilities; Catalina Devandas Aguilar, Special Rapporteur on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities; Ikponwosa Ero, Independent Expert on the Enjoyment of Human Rights of Persons with Albinism

Written By: Sophia Kotik, WIT Representative

50 Years of Human Rights Covenants

 

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Wednesday, October 19th,  the General Assembly celebrated and discussed the 50th anniversary of the adoption of the International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights (ICCPR) and the International Covenant on Economic, Social and Cultural Rights (ICESCR). His Excellency Peter Thomson began by summarizing the success that the Human Rights Covenants have had over the past fifty years. He stressed that the covenants have transformed lives by changing constitutions and laws and legally obligating states to recognize and protect individual human rights. He iterated the importance of the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development and argued the need for the Agenda and the covenants to proceed jointly. Additionally, he pointed out that the adherence to the covenants is necessary in achieving SDG 16 (promoting peace and inclusive societies for sustainable development), upon which all the other SDGs are reliant. Mr. Zeid Ra’ad Al Hussein also expressed the idea that promoting human rights pushes states toward greater stability. Furthermore, he argued that the Paris climate change agreements found their roots in the ICCPR and ICESCR, and they promote the right to highest attainable standard of health. The Representative of Chile on Behalf of the Latin American states added that the ICCPR and ICESCR are both closely linked to sustainable development, an integral part of human rights.

Mr. Waleed Sadi expanded on the importance of the coordination and cooperation between both of the covenants. He pointed out that the United States had both signed and ratified ICCPR, but had only signed ICESCR. The Representative of the United States expressed the importance of promoting human rights in the United Nations and emphasized a strong commitment to doing so. Additionally, she argued that the ICCPR guarantees steady progress towards the goals outlined in ICESCR.

Meeting: “Implementation of Human Rights Instruments: Commemoration of the Fiftieth Anniversary of the Adoption of the International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights and the International Covenant on Economic, Social and Cultural Rights”

Date/Time/Location: Wednesday, October 19th, 2016; 10:00; General Assembly Hall

Speakers: His Excellency Peter Thomson, President of the General Assembly; His Excellency Jan Eliasson, Deputy Secretary General of the United Nations; Mr. Zeid Ra’ad Al Hussein, United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights; Mr. Waleed Sadi, Chair of the UN Committee on Economic, Social and Cultural Rights; Representative of the Asia-Pacific group; Representative of Georgia on behalf of Eastern European states; Representative of Chile on behalf of Latin American states; Representative of the United Kingdom and Ireland on behalf of the Western European states; Representative of the United States

Written By: Anna Prisco, WIT Representative